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Healey-Driscoll Administration Announces $246 Million to Build and Preserve 1,600 Affordable and Mixed-Income Housing Units (video)

Direct subsidies, state and federal housing tax credits will support 27 projects in 20 communities across the state for low-income residents

LOWELL – Today, the Healey-Driscoll Administration awarded $246 million in direct subsidies and state and federal housing tax credits to build and preserve nearly 1,600 affordable homes throughout Massachusetts. Governor Maura T. Healey, Lieutenant Governor Kim Driscoll, Housing and Community Development Secretary Appointee Ed Augustus, and Undersecretary Jennifer Maddox joined Lowell City Manager Thomas Golden to announce the awards to 27 projects in 20 cities and towns.

Today’s awards leverage substantial state and federal resources, with $105 million in direct subsidies, $60 million from federal American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) funding, and $81 million in state and federal tax credits. Awarded projects will provide new housing options in every region, serving a diverse array of communities, including new affordable senior housing in Dracut and family housing in Lenox. Nearly all of the 1,597 units will be reserved for low-income households, including more than 300 units for extremely low-income households and families or individuals facing housing instability. Four projects will rehabilitate existing affordable housing, ensuring quality housing and long-term affordability.

“Today’s awards set in motion 27 innovative, mixed-use projects that will build and preserve nearly 1,600 affordable units across every region of our state,” said Governor Healey. “These are the types of projects that our Executive Office of Housing and Livable Communities will be driving in close collaboration with local, federal and private sector partners to address our housing crisis.

“We are thrilled to see projects in communities across Massachusetts, from Pittsfield to Provincetown, that have strong local support and will bring much needed new housing to our neighborhoods,” said Lieutenant Governor Driscoll. “Our housing needs are great, and we are excited to move forward with a new, cabinet-level secretariat to create more homes and lower housing costs for residents.”

The awards will fund innovative models for development with a priority placed on projects with green and sustainable building practices, projects which feature housing for extremely low-income residents, and family and senior developments. Awardees include three projects in Boston which combine affordable rental units along with market-rate and affordable condominiums, four projects will be geared towards seniors, and more than half of the projects will be built to energy efficient “Passive House” certification standards.

The Healey-Driscoll Administration is committed to making housing development a top priority. On March 1, Governor Healey filed Article 87 legislation to create the Executive Office of Housing and Livable Communities moving the Department of Housing and Community Development out of the current Executive Office of Housing and Economic Development into the new secretariat and broadening its scope of work to include housing production.

 

“The Executive Office of Housing and Livable Communities is being created at a critical time for our Commonwealth. We need to address our housing crisis head on and move our state forward on our housing goals to increase production, lower costs and expand access to affordable units,” said Ed Augustus, who will become Secretary of the Executive Office of Housing and Livable Communities on June 1. “These Affordable Rental Housing Awards are an important step to achieve these goals, and I look forward to expanding programs like this across the state as Housing Secretary.”

“We are proud to support such a fantastic round of projects, which will welcome new families and households to neighborhoods across the Commonwealth,” said Undersecretary Maddox. “Affordable housing supports our most vulnerable residents, but it also enriches and stabilizes communities, ensures our communities are diverse, inclusive, and provides strong foundations for all our families to thrive.”

 

In Lowell, Boston Capital will preserve an existing historic façade and build 52 new affordable homes, including 11 reserved for extremely low-income households. Currently, the site is home to the Merrimack Valley Food Bank, which will relocate to a new site in Lowell. The site is adjacent to the Pawtucket Canal Reservoir and Francis Gate Park in the Acre Neighborhood, with access to local amenities.

 

“This is a remarkable opportunity to provide more affordable housing to residents of the City of Lowell, and the City Council is proud to reaffirm our commitment to this vital issue with $250,000 in HOME funds,” said City Manager Thomas A. Golden, Jr. “The City of Lowell is grateful for the vision and partnership of Governor Healey, Lieutenant Governor Driscoll, and their administration, and we look forward to supporting more projects like this in the future.”

 

“We are grateful to DHCD and the City of Lowell for their support and funding for 733 Broadway,” said Rich Mazzochi, Managing Director, Boston Capital. “This will help with a critical need for affordable housing units in the City and will create a stable community for future residence to thrive.”

 

“The Merrimack Valley Food Bank has been dreaming of a new home for many years and finally our dream has been realized. We are excited to sell our building to Boston Capital and their plan for the site. Our building was gifted to us 30 years ago by the Stagnone Family, owners of Lowell Fruit Company and has served us well for over 30 years,” said Debbie Callery, Executive Director, Merrimack Valley Food Bank. “The Boston Capital project will provide much needed affordable housing for the city, a well thought out beautiful plan which will be a beautiful addition to the neighborhood. We can’t wait to see the building plan become a reality.”

 

2023 Affordable Housing Awards

84 Warren Street, Boston

84 Warren Street is a demolition and new construction project located in Roxbury. The sponsor is the non-profit Madison Park Development Corporation. On a prime site near Nubian Square, this family housing project will feature 43 affordable rental units, 22 for sale condominium units, and space for the Urban League of Massachusetts, which has served the Roxbury community for over a century. DHCD will support the project with federal and state low-income housing tax credits, subsidy funds, and ARPA funds. The city of Boston will support the project with funds of its own. In addition, MassHousing will support the ownership component of 84 Warren Street with funds from its Commonwealth Builders program. When completed, the project will include at least 16 rental units reserved for households earning less than 30% of Area Median Income (AMI) and, in some cases, transitioning from homelessness. The project has been designed to meet Passive House certification standards.

 

2085 Washington Street, Boston

2085 Washington Street is a new construction mixed-use project located in Roxbury. The sponsor is a partnership between Trinity Financial and the non-profit Madison Park Development Corporation. The project will feature 64 affordable rental units as well as 32 mixed-income condominium units and below-grade parking on a site adjacent to the Tropical Foods grocery at the corner of Melnea Cass Boulevard and Washington Street. DHCD will support the project with federal and state low-income housing tax credits, subsidy funds, and ARPA funds. The city of Boston will support the project with significant funds of its own. The completed project will include 16 rental units for households earning less than 30% of AMI and, in some cases, transitioning from homelessness. In addition, MassHousing will support the ownership units with funds from its Commonwealth Builders program. The project has been designed to meet Passive House certification standards.

 

Columbia Crossing, Boston

Columbia Crossing is a 48-unit new construction and rehabilitation project located in Uphams Corner, across from the historic Strand Theater. The sponsor is a partnership between Dorchester Bay Economic Development Corporation and Preservation of Affordable Housing (POAH). DHCD will support the project with federal and state low-income housing tax credits, subsidy funds, and funds from the American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA). The city of Boston will support the project with funds of its own. When completed, Columbia Crossing will offer 48 affordable units for households whose average income will be less than 60 percent of AMI. At least 10 units will be reserved for families earning less than 30 percent of AMI and, in some cases, transitioning from homelessness. The project has been designed to meet Passive House certification standards.

 

Columbia Uphams, Boston

Columbia Uphams is a preservation/rehabilitation project located in Dorchester. The nonprofit sponsor is The Affordable Housing and Services Collaborative, Inc. Columbia Uphams consists of two existing occupied projects, Columbia West and Uphams Corner Apartments. The projects will be combined into a single project and rehabilitated. DHCD will support Columbia Uphams with federal and state low-income housing tax credits and subsidy funds. The city of Boston will provide funds of its own to support the project. When completed, the project will include 91 rehabilitated affordable units, including units reserved for special populations. The sponsor will provide support services as needed to project residents. Columbia Uphams has been designed to Enterprise Green Communities standards.

 

Old Colony Phase 6, Boston

Old Colony Phase 6 is the final phase of the redevelopment of the largescale Old Colony public housing project located in South Boston. The sponsor, Beacon Communities, has worked closely for over a decade with the Boston Housing Authority, the city of Boston, and DHCD on the multi-phased initiative. DHCD will support this phase of the transit-oriented project with federal and state low-income housing tax credits and subsidy funds. The Boston Housing Authority also will support Phase 6. This phase will consist of 89 highly sustainable new construction units designed to meet Passive House certification standards. All 89 units will be affordable to families or individuals, including seniors. At least 13 percent of the units will be reserved for families or individuals earning less than 30% of AMI. Phase 6 also will include space for SPOKE, a community-based arts organization.

 

Parcel R-1, Boston

Parcel R-1 is a new construction, mixed-use and mixed-tenure project to be constructed on a city-owned parking lot in Boston’s Chinatown neighborhood. The non-profit sponsor is Asian Community Development Corporation. The project will consist of a single 12-story structure housing 66 affordable rental units, 44 affordable condominiums, and a new branch of the Boston Public Library. DHCD will support the rental units in Parcel R1 with federal and state low-income housing tax credits and subsidy funds. The city of Boston also will support the project with significant funds of its own. When completed, the 66 rental units in Parcel R1 will be restricted for households whose average income is below 60 percent of AMI. Fourteen rental units will be further restricted for households earning less than 30 percent of AMI and, in some cases, transitioning from homelessness. This transit-oriented project will incorporate significant elements of green design. The sponsor intends to meet Passive House certification standards.

 

Talbot Commons II, Boston

Talbot Commons II is a demolition and new construction project located on two sites in Boston’s Codman Square neighborhood. The sponsor is the non-profit Codman Square Neighborhood Development Corporation. DHCD will support the project with federal and state low-income housing tax credits, subsidy funds, and ARPA funds. The city of Boston will support the project with funds of its own. When completed, Talbot Commons II will feature 42 affordable rental units for families, including 11 units for families earning less than 30 percent of AMI and, in some cases, transitioning from homelessness. The project has been designed to meet Passive House certification standards.

 

Watson Place, Braintree

Watson Place is a new construction project for families to be built in downtown Braintree, .4 miles from the Weymouth Landing MBTA stop. The sponsor is Arch Communities LLC. The project will feature a pedestrian riverwalk, and the town of Braintree will undertake numerous streetscape improvements near Watson Place. DHCD will support the project with federal and state low-income housing tax credits, subsidy funds, and ARPA funds. When completed, this mixed-income project will include 56 total units serving five income bands, including 30 units restricted for families at less than 60 percent of AMI and additional units restricted at 110 precent and 120 percent of AMI. Watson Place also will be supported by the town of Braintree, by a state MassWorks award, and by a Congressional earmark for nearby infrastructure improvements. The project has been designed to meet Enterprise Green Communities standards and Passive House certification standards.

 

Clifton Place Phase 1, Cambridge

Clifton Place Phase 1 is one phase of the planned three-phase redevelopment of Jefferson Park, a large-scale public housing project located in Cambridge. The sponsor is the Cambridge Housing Authority. DHCD will support Clifton Place with federal low-income housing tax credits and subsidy funds, as well as ARPA funds. The city of Cambridge also will support Clifton Place with funds of its own. When completed, this phase of the overall project will include 87 new construction units. All 87 units will be reserved for households earning less than 60 percent of AMI. At least 13 percent of the units will be further reserved for households earning less than 30 percent of AMI. Clifton Place has been designed to incorporate numerous green features.

 

Singing Bridge Residences, Chicopee

Singing Bridge Residences is a new construction project to be built in Chicopee on a site bordering the Chicopee River. The sponsor is Brisa Development LLC (Hammad Graham). The sponsor was selected to develop the project, located in a mill overlay district, through a city solicitation process. DHCD will support Singing Bridge Residences with federal and state low-income housing tax credits, subsidy funds, and ARPA funds. The city of Chicopee will provide funds of its own to support the project. When the project is finished, it will offer 105 total new units. Seventy-two units will be reserved for households earning less than 60 percent of AMI, with 16 units further reserved for households earning less than 30 percent of AMI. The project has been designed to incorporate numerous green features, including all-electric heat.

 

Greenmont Senior Residences, Dracut

Greenmont Senior Residences is a project for seniors to be built in Dracut. The sponsor, the non-profit Common Ground Development Corporation, was selected to develop the project through a town solicitation process. DHCD will support the project with federal and state low-income housing tax credits, subsidy funds, and ARPA funds. The town of Dracut will support the project with funds of its own. When completed, the project will feature 56 affordable units for seniors, including 11 units to be reserved for seniors earning less than 30 percent of AMI. As required by DHCD, the sponsor will provide support services to all new residents of the project. Greenmont Senior Housing has been designed to incorporate features of green and sustainable development.

 

Meshacket Commons, Edgartown

Meshacket Commons is a new construction project to be built in Edgartown on Martha’s Vineyard. The project sponsor is a partnership between Affirmative Investments and the non-profit Island Housing Trust. The partnership was selected to develop the town-owned site through a 2021 town solicitation process. When completed, Meshacket Commons will offer 36 total units: 32 affordable rental units and four ownership units. DHCD will support the project with federal and state low-income housing tax credits, subsidy funds, and ARPA funds. The town of Edgartown also will provide support to the project. Meshacket Commons was zoned through Chapter 40B. The project has been designed to meet Passive House certification standards.

 

470 Main Street, Fitchburg

470 Main Street is an existing mixed-use property in downtown Fitchburg. The sponsor is the nonprofit NewVue Communities. During the COVID19 pandemic, the first-floor commercial tenant vacated its 8,000 square foot space, which NewVue now will convert to additional affordable housing units. DHCD will support the project with low-income housing tax credits and subsidy funds. The city of Fitchburg also will provide support to the project. When completed, 470 Main Street will feature 38 total units, with 26 units affordable to households earning less than 60 percent of AMI. Four units will be reserved for households earning less than 30 percent of AMI. The new units to be constructed in the vacant commercial space will include electric heat pumps.

 

Brushwood Farm, Lenox

Brushwood Farm is a new construction project for families to be built in Lenox. Permitted through Chapter 40B, the project is sponsored by Pennrose LLC. The sponsor has worked closely with the town on the project, which will result in 65 new rental units in a region with great need for more affordable housing. DHCD will support the project with federal and state low-income housing tax credits, subsidy funds, and ARPA funds. The town of Lenox is providing funds of its own to the project. When completed, 50 of the 65 units will be restricted for households earning less than 60 percent of AMI, with nine units further restricted for households earning less than 30 percent of AMI. The project has been designed to meet Passive House certification standards.

 

733 Broadway, Lowell

733 Broadway is a 52-unit project to be built in Lowell. The sponsor is Boston Capital. While the project primarily will consist of new construction, the sponsor will retain and restore parts of an existing historic façade. DHCD will support the project with federal and state low-income housing tax credits, subsidy funds, and ARPA funds. The city of Lowell also will support the project with funds of its own. When completed, all 52 units will be reserved for households earning less than 60 percent of AMI, with 11 units further reserved for households earning less than 30 percent of AMI and, in some cases, transitioning from homelessness. The project has been designed to meet Passive House certification standards.

 

Greenstead Grove, Ludlow

Greenstead Grove is a new construction townhomes project to be built in Ludlow. The sponsor is the non-profit Way Finders, Inc. DHCD will support the project with federal and state low-income housing tax credits, subsidy funds, and ARPA funds. When completed, Greenstead Grove will offer 43 affordable units for families, with 16 units reserved for families earning less than 30 percent of AMI and, in some cases, transitioning from homelessness. Permitted through Chapter 40B, the development team included a sustainability consultant, and the project has been designed to feature all-electric heat pumps for heating and cooling, solar arrays on all roofs, and other green features.

 

West Newton Armory, Newton

West Newton Armory is an adaptive re-use and new construction project located in Newton. The sponsor is a partnership between Civico Development and the non-profit Metro West Community Development. The project includes the adaptation of an existing historic armory as well as the construction of 43 new affordable units. Seven of the affordable units will be reserved for households earning less than 30 percent of AMI. DHCD will support this transit-oriented project with federal and state low-income housing tax credits, subsidy funds, and ARPA funds. The new construction component of the project has been designed to meet Passive House certification standards. The sponsor also intends to install solar photovoltaic panels on the roof.

 

23 Laurel Street, Northampton

23 Laurel Street is a new construction project to be built in Northampton on city-owned land. The sponsor is the nonprofit Valley Community Development Corporation. DHCD will support this townhouse project for families with federal and state low-income housing tax credits, subsidy funds, and funds from the American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA). When completed, Laurel Street will offer 20 new units restricted for households earning less than 60 percent of AMI. Twelve units will be further restricted for households earning less than 30 percent of AMI and, in some cases, transitioning from homelessness. The project has been designed to use electric heat and will include solar photovoltaic arrays on the townhouse roofs.

 

107 Main Street, Orleans

107 Main Street is a new construction project to be built in Orleans. The sponsor, selected through a town solicitation process, is the nonprofit Housing Assistance Corporation. Permitted through Chapter 40B, the project will feature 14 new affordable units for individuals and/or families. DHCD will support the project with subsidy funds and the town of Orleans also will provide significant funds of its own to 107 Main Street. The project has been designed to incorporate numerous green features, including electric heat.

 

First Street Apartments, Pittsfield

First Street Apartments is an adaptive re-use project located in Pittsfield. The sponsor is the nonprofit Berkshire Housing Development Corporation. The project consists of the adaptive reuse of a Pittsfield church to create nine small affordable studios for homeless individuals. DHCD previously awarded supportive housing funds to the project and now is awarding nine project-based vouchers to First Street. The city of Pittsfield has provided substantial funds to support the project which also has received a $1.25 million award from the Massachusetts Alliance for Supportive Housing (MASH). The sponsor will provide support services to the new tenants and will operate a resource center within the church.

 

3 Jerome Smith Road, Provincetown

3 Jerome Smith Road is a 65-unit construction project for families to be built in Provincetown. The nonprofit sponsor is The Community Builders. DHCD will support this mixed-income project with federal and state low-income housing tax credits, subsidy funds, and ARPA funds. The town of Provincetown also will provide significant funds in support of the project. Permitted through Chapter 40B, 3 Jerome Smith Road will feature 61 affordable units and four market rate units. The project has been designed to incorporate numerous green development characteristics, including all-electric heating and cooling and solar-ready roofs.

 

Leefort Terrace, Salem

Leefort Terrace is a demolition and new construction project located in Salem. The sponsor is Beacon Communities working with the Salem Housing Authority. The sponsor will demolish existing obsolete senior housing and construct a new mid-rise building with 124 units for seniors and families. DHCD will support the project with federal and state low-income housing tax credits and subsidy funds. The city of Salem also will provide significant funds of its own – including ARPA funds — to support Leefort Terrace. When completed, the project will include 50 affordable units for seniors and 74 affordable units for families. At least 25 units will be reserved for individuals or families earning less than 30 percent of AMI. The project has been designed to meet Passive House standards and to be certified through Enterprise Green Communities. The sponsor plans to install solar photovoltaic panels on the roof of the new building.

 

Henry T. Wing School Residences, Sandwich

Henry T. Wing School Residences is the first phase of a three-phase development initiative in Sandwich. The sponsor is Stratford Capital Group (SCG) working with the nonprofit CHOICE Housing Opportunities. The first phase of the project – both adaptive reuse of a historic school and new construction — will result in 38 new affordable units for seniors. DHCD will support the first phase with federal and state low-income housing tax credits and subsidy funds. The town of Sandwich also will support this phase of the project with funds of its own. Of the 38 total units in phase one, 34 will be affordable to seniors earning less than 60 percent of AMI, with eight units further restricted for seniors earning less than 30% of AMI. As required by DHCD, the sponsors — SCG and CHOICE — will provide support services to all new residents of the project. The project has been designed to incorporate numerous green features, including all-electric heating and cooling.

 

Westminster Senior Residences, Westminster

Westminster Senior Residences is a new construction project to be built in Westminster adjacent to the town’s senior center. The sponsor is Commonwealth Community Developers, LLC. DHCD will support the project with federal and state low-income housing tax credits, subsidy funds, and ARPA. The town of Westminster also will support the project with its own funds. When completed, the project will feature 50 new affordable units for seniors earning less than 60 percent of AMI, with ten units further restricted for seniors earning less than 30 percent of AMI. As required by DHCD, the sponsor will provide support services for the new residents of the project. Westminster Senior Residences will include features of green and sustainable development, including high efficiency, cold climate heat pumps. The sponsor included a sustainability consultant on the development team.

 

Streeter and Poland, Winchendon

Streeter and Poland is an adaptive re-use and new construction project located in Winchendon. The sponsor is the non-profit Montachusett Veterans Outreach Center (MVOC). With assistance from DHCD and other lenders, MVOC will convert two vacant school buildings into affordable housing units with services for veterans. DHCD will support the project with low-income housing tax credits and subsidy funds. When completed, the project will offer 44 affordable units, with 16 units reserved for veterans earning less than 30 percent of AMI and, in some cases, transitioning from homelessness. The project has been designed to include features of green development.

 

Curtis Apartments, Worcester

Curtis Apartments Phase 1 is the first of the four-phase redevelopment of a large-scale public housing project in Worcester. The sponsor is Trinity Financial working with the Worcester Housing Authority. The full redevelopment plan consists of the demolition of 372 obsolete units and the new construction of 527 affordable units. Curtis Apartments Phase 1 will include construction of 129 new units in two buildings, with over 80 percent of the units reserved for households earning less than 60 percent of AMI. At least 13 units will be further restricted for households earning less than 30% of AMI. DHCD will support the project with federal and state low-income housing tax credits, subsidy funds, and ARPA. The city of Worcester also will support the project with funds of its own. Curtis Apartments Phase 1 has been designed to meet Passive House certification standards.

 

Worcester Boys Club, Worcester

Worcester Boys Club is an adaptive re-use and new construction project located in Worcester’s Lincoln Square. The sponsor is WinnDevelopment. The project consists of the adaptive re-use of the historic Worcester Boys Club and the construction of a new building. The existing historic building and the new construction building will be joined by a connector. The project is intended to serve individuals age 55 or over as well as families with at least one member age 55 or over. DHCD will support the project with federal and state low-income housing tax credits, subsidy funds, and ARPA funds. The city of Worcester also will support the project with funds of its own. When completed, the project will offer 80 affordable units reserved for individuals or households who meet the age requirements and earn less than 60 percent of AMI. Twelve units will be further reserved for individuals or households earning less than 30 percent of AMI and, in some cases, transitioning from homelessness. This transit-oriented project will incorporate numerous characteristics of green development, with the new construction building designed to meet Passive House certification standards.

 

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